Top Reasons Not to Quit Coffee

Many studies have found that coffee has numerous components — many of them antioxidants — that can be good for your health. Although too much caffeine can be dehydrating, drinking at least one cup of coffee a day, according to a recent Japanese study, can cut your risk for bleeding in the brain. Keep coffee…

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Vitamins for Women: What to Take and When

  More than half of all American adults take multivitamins or other dietary supplements, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Women in particular have been quick to jump on the supplement bandwagon, despite past research that challenged the effectiveness of multivitamins in the prevention of cancer and heart disease. Recent studies have…

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Diabetes Prevention Research: A Small Sliver of a Big Pie

  Most diabetes research focuses on treating the disease with medications rather than preventing it, according to a new analysis from researchers at Duke University. Their research also uncovered the fact that few trials specifically target seniors and children, groups that may require specially tailored diabetes prevention and treatment approaches.   Experts project that more…

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Why Is It So Hard to Exercise?

  You know you should do it. And you know why: Exercising — simply put, moving instead of sitting — is critical for safeguarding your health and setting a good example for your kids. So why does it seem so hard to get yourself moving? The truth is: You can. But knowing how and why…

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Overcoming Barriers

  A barrier is something that keeps you from doing something else. If you’re not active, it’s likely that you have at least one reason why. Perhaps you’ve never been very active. Maybe you’re afraid you’ll get low blood glucose. Think about what’s keeping you from being active and then check out some of our…

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Certain Contraceptive May Pose Risk of Type 2 Diabetes for Obese Women

A first-of-its-kind study by researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) indicates that healthy, obese, reproductive-age women who use long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) containing the hormone progestin have a slightly increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes when compared to those who use non-hormonal contraception.  The research concludes…

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High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy May Signal Later Diabetes, Heart and Kidney Disease Risk

  High blood pressure during pregnancy — even once or twice during routine medical care — can signal substantially higher risks of heart and kidney disease and diabetes, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation. “All of the later life risks were similar in pregnant women who could otherwise be considered low-risk — those…

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Type 2 Diabetes and Sleep Troubles

  Sleep is important for everyone, but it’s especially important when your body experiences changing blood sugar levels and other symptoms of type 2 diabetes. “Sleep deprivation causes changes in the effectiveness of the body’s control of appetite, which can lead to weight gain, higher blood sugar, and increased resistance to insulin,” says Richard Castriotta, MD, director…

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Type 2 Diabetes and Sleep Troubles

Sleep is important for everyone, but it’s especially important when your body experiences changing blood sugar levels and other symptoms of type 2 diabetes. “Sleep deprivation causes changes in the effectiveness of the body’s control of appetite, which can lead to weight gain, higher blood sugar, and increased resistance to insulin,” says Richard Castriotta, MD, director of…

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